Workshop “Basic Income & Social Rights: Local and European Perspectives” in Bologna

Workshop “Basic Income & Social Rights: Local and European Perspectives” in Bologna

Join Green European Foundation for a workshop exploring basic income, existing pilot projects, and the potential impact of such schemes on our societies on the 24th of April from 5.30pm to 7.30pm at the Social Center TPO, Via Camillo Casarini 17/5, Bologna, BO 40131 Italy.

Event Background

This event is part of the Green European Foundation transnational project Basic Income – European Public Debate.

Basic income has emerged in recent years as a potential tool to reverse the current issues facing society, such as lack of affordable housing and access to education and healthcare, income inequality and disparity between generations.

As basic income gradually permeates into mainstream debates and factors like technological advancements change our understanding of work, it is important to explore how such a scheme could be implemented, and the impact it would have on social rights at the local and European level.

About the Event

This workshop will be held as a side event of the Federation of Young European Greens (FYEG) four day educational event on social rights, and organised with the support of FYEG.

It will bring together young people locally and from across Europe, with international participants including those from FYEG member organisations, social movements, and trade unions.

Participants will learn via roundtable discussions about basic income, existing pilot projects and the connection with social rights. They will identify the pressing requirements to make such a scheme a reality.

Programme

The workshop will be divided into three parts, with breaks in between:

  • The presentation of the GEF publication European Green Perspectives on Basic Income will provide an introduction to the basic income concept and describe successes and limitations of past pilot projects, and discuss the results of research into the impact of basic income schemes on access to housing, education, healthcare and employment.
  • Two fishbowl-style dialogues will serve as a basis to discuss the challenges and solutions to basic income implementation. This part will touch upon the need for certain infrastructure to be in place and the challenges associated with competing views of basic income.
  • Finally, roundtable discussions will delve deeper into the realisation of basic income on the local and European level, with a focus on connecting the two levels together and how basic income could strengthen social rights at these levels.

Speakers

  • Natalie Bennett, GEF Board of Directors
  • Alex Foti, author of the General Theory of the Precariat

Registration

The workshop will be free and open to everyone but subject to registration. You can register by filling in this form. Deadline for registration is Wednesday, 17 April 2019, midnight CET.

Language

The event will be held in English but whispered translation from English into Italian can be provided on the spot.

The co-created story of Jardim Nakamura neighbourhood

The co-created story of Jardim Nakamura neighbourhood

The co-created story of Jardim Nakamura neighbourhood


Image: Sofia Croso Mazzuco. The welcoming of Jardim Nakamura map showing the local context.

Jardim Nakamura is a peripheric community in the city of São Paulo, in Jardim Ângela neighbourhood, and the lucky place chosen for an urban signalling project that aims to tell the story of the territory in order to bring a new sense of appropriation and belonging to the area. The project called “Passeia, Jardim Nakamura”- which means “stroll, Jardim Nakamura” – was developed by two NGO’s; SampaPé! (1), which promotes the appropriation of the city through the genuine act of walking and occupying public spaces; and COURB (2), which promotes the encounter between organizations that aim to strengthen collaboration for development in the urban environment. 

On a hands-on effort that occurred on December 7 and 8, 2018 in the streets of the community, different people participated on what is called mutirão in Brazil (meaning bottom-up, collective action) to install three types of urban signalling:

– the first one aiming to point directions and walking distance to specific places within the area;

– the second one showing where people are within the big community map;

– and the third one telling the history of specific places (for example where the neighbourhood started or stories about the local culture). (3)

The project clearly made it possible for the neighbourhood to be reinserted in the history and territory of the city of São Paulo in a different manner, since the acknowledgement that there are stories worth being registered invites a different outlook towards Jardim Nakamura. Children who live in the neighbourhood also participated in the installation of the signalling through a treasure hunt game, where the finding of a signalling spot was linked to the painting of that area with a project symbol. Involving children in this activity aimed to help promote appropriation of the place and the awareness of being a citizen and helping build the local history.

The area already received many visitors before the project was completed, for hosting a local community institution which is an example of sustainability and circular economy – namely the institute Favela da Paz (4), which explores different projects linked to local culture, citizenship, music, clean energy production and the well known cooking project Vegearte (5). This institute also partnered and gave support to the “Passeia, Jardim Nakamura” project, for believing in the value it could bring to the territory.


Image: Sofia Croso Mazzuco. Jardim Nakamura seen from above.  

Besides the direct influence of the project in the community, it has also contributed to the discussion of how telling the story of a place through different lenses can help heal and bring new meaning to a territory; something worth considering when understating the power urban design has to influence the life of communities.


Image: Sofia Croso Mazzuco. One of the signalling showing the distance to interest places.

1. https://www.mobilize.org.br/blogs/sampa-pe/

2.  https://www.courb.org/pt/

3. https://medium.com/@sampape/pela-primeira-vez-sinaliza%C3%A7%C3%A3o-para-pedestres-chega-a-bairro-da-periferia-de-s%C3%A3o-paulo-395a40d99bb0

4. https://faveladapaz.wordpress.com/

5. https://projetovegearte.wordpress.com/

The Last module of the Urban Clinic LabGov EDU A.A. 2018/2019

The Last module of the Urban Clinic LabGov EDU A.A. 2018/2019

The fifth module of the Urban Clinic EDU@LabGov took place on Friday the 12th and Saturday the 13th of April into the Viale Romania Campus of LUISS University. The workshop has inaugurated the fifth module of the course. The module was dedicated to “Communication”.

The workshop hosted one important expert on these themes: prof. Paolo Peverini, professor at the Department of Enterprise and Management and Political Sciences in Luiss Guido Carli University, and he is expert in Marketing Communication and new media languages. Saturday, we hosted Chiara De Angelis, expert in information architecture and user experience design , who supported the LabGovers in drafting the communication plan for their project idea.

WORKSHOP

Prof. Peverini asked the LabGovers what communication plan they had in mind for their project.

After explaining their idea, prof. Peverini focused on how difficult it is to communicate a message. So, to try to effectively develop a message it becomes necessary to make the most of the cross-media effects.
These effects show how the combined use of different media and the order of the media used to spread a message can cause a different reading of the same.

At the end of the workshop, Professor Peverini gave some suggestions to take care of the communication of our project.
He emphasized how important it is to avoid a techno-deterministic approach, which dwells exclusively on the effectiveness of the medium. In fact, for Prof. Peverini, it is much more important to take care of the substantial and content aspects of the message.

CO-WORKING

Chiara De Angelis explained to LabGovers what are the essential elements that every communication plan should have. Based on the two examples and on the points that Dr. De Angelis highlighted, LabGovers divided into three groups to develop the communication plan for their project. It is important for them to place their project: this means underlining the fact that they are trying to transform the urban gardens into innovation hubs, by developing a new generation of digital gardens and a digital platform that will allow the urban gardeners and farmers to investigate the status of well-being in the cities. Another relevant feature for their path is the focus given to sustainability and in particular to the 17 SDGs of the 2030 Agenda.

After delivering their work, the LabGovers split into groups again to work on the user stories of their digital platform.

At the end of the exhibition, the LabGovers were divided into groups in order to create a prototype of the platform through an app, which allows you to link drawings and photographs between them through hyperlinks that can be placed on the photographs themselves. The result should therefore be a model of the platform that will be developed.

The last module ends like this but I assure you that it’s not over here.

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU 2019: V Module

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU 2019: V Module

Save the date: the fifth module of the Urban Clinic EDU@LabGov will take place on 12th and 13th April in Luiss Guido Carli University. This fifth module is mainly dedicated to ‘Communication’.

On Friday 12th April the workshop will take place in the classroom 310 from 16pm to 18pm in the Luiss Campus.

The Urban Clinic will host prof. Paolo Peverini, professor at the Department of Impresa and Management and Political Sciences in Luiss Guido Carli University, and he is expert in Marketing Communication and new media languages. This meeting will represent an important step in the development of the launch of the digital platform that Labgovers have designed in order to understand how to communicate its value by exploiting the potential of social media.

On Saturday 13th April from 10 am to 17 pm in room 310 of the Luiss Guido Carli Campus will take place the fifth co-working session. The Urban Clinic will host Arianna Vulpiani, agricultural entrepreneur of the Biofarm Orto (https://www.facebook.com/biofarmorto/) and host of RadioFood. She will talk to the Labgovers about her professional experience and the connection between urban agriculture, healthy food, entrepreneurship. She has communicated in a very disruptive way her life choices and she will try to guide the Labgovers in their communication planning session. The co-working session will be moderated from Chiara De Angelis, former president of LabGov and UX designer at Fifth Beat and from the team of EDU@LabGov to support the students in order to develop the communication plan for their idea and to keep on developing the digital platform.

Stay Tuned!

Save the date! The final Local Action Plan co-design session of the Rome Collaboratory is coming!

Save the date! The final Local Action Plan co-design session of the Rome Collaboratory is coming!

Saturday, 13th of April at 10:00 at Fusolab2.0 in via della Bella Villa, 94 the final meeting of the Local Action Plan co-working process of the Rome Collaboratory will take place.


The fourth and final session of the co-working lab of the Local Action Plan of the Rome Collaboratory will be focused on finalizing the social business model plan.

The activities at the core of the Rome Collaboratory are related to cultural and creative services, sustainable tourism, circular economy based on the reuse of the Centocelle heritage site.


The Rome Collaboratory lab is working on ways to include the local community of civic and commercial actors (residents-owned restaurants; NGOs that manages open green areas and community gardens; hospitality activities; community hubs) in the practice of adaptive reuse, as well in the governance and financial model for the reuse of the cultural heritage.