Common value. Building a new relationship between the Economy and society/ Valore comune: rivedere il rapporto tra economia e società alla luce dei fattori di crisi economica ed ambientale

Common value. Building a new relationship between the Economy and society/ Valore comune: rivedere il rapporto tra economia e società alla luce dei fattori di crisi economica ed ambientale

// English version hereafter //

Il 14 giugno la Fondazione IFEL ospiterà, presso Palazzo Baldassini dalle ore 10 alle 13, un incontro dal titolo “Valore comune. La crisi ecologica e la crisi finanziaria chiedono un nuovo rapporto tra economia e società” per stimolare il dibattito tra studiosi e policy makers su come gestire la transizione ecologica nel quadro di un’economia responsabile dal punto di vista sociale ed ambientale che garantisca la crescita inclusiva attraverso la creazione di valore condiviso.

Parteciperà a seminario Gaèl Giraud (Chief Economist dell’Agenzia di Sviluppo Francese); Marco Damilano (Direttore de l’Espresso); Pierciro Galeone (Direttore Fondazione IFEL); Alessandra Smerilli (Pontificia Facoltà dell’educazione Auxilium); Edoardo Zanchini (Legambiente); Christian Iaione (LUISS, LabGov.city).

ENGLISH Description

Next June 14th 2019, the IFEL Foundation will host a discussion on the theme “Common Value: the Ecological crisis and financial crisis impel a new relationship between the Economy and society”. The event will be held from 10am to 1pm at the Palazzo Baldassini.


Launch of the incubation process of the Local Action Plan (LAP) of the Rome Collaboratory within the Open Heritage project.

Launch of the incubation process of the Local Action Plan (LAP) of the Rome Collaboratory within the Open Heritage project.

On Saturday March 16th from 11:00 a.m. to 13 AM at the community hub of the Alessandrino neighborhood Fusolab, the incubation process of the “Local Action Plan of the Collaboratory of Rome” officially started.

The activity represents a key stage of the Horizon2020 OpenHeritage.eu project which investigates and experiments economically sustainable and inclusive governance models of tangible and intangible cultural heritage in cities. The Local Action Plan (hereinafter: LAP) defines the mission and strategy; activities; business plan of the Rome Collaboratory, one of the six “Cooperative Heritage Labs” of the Open Heritage project, where socially and economically sustainable models of cultural heritage reuse will be designed and tested.

Coordinated and facilitated by the LUISS LabGov team, the meeting (which was open to all stakeholders in the Alessandrino-Centocelle-Torre Spaccata district willing and motivated to participate) was aimed at defining the mission, objectives and strategies of the “Local Action Plan”, as well as creating a shared agenda to structure its activities, starting in June 2019.

The meeting participants were a wide range of district’s stakeholders: local NGOs; commercial actors active in the Centocelle heritage area; founding members of the neighborhood cooperative and recognized FARO heritage community incubated by LUISS in previous years, CooperACTiva; representatives of LegaCoop; city inhabitants interested in the project.

The LUISS LabGov team introduced the Open Heritage project and the Rome Collaboratory’s goals and specific objectives to the meeting’s participants. The meeting then entered into the part where the organization and structure of the incubation process is defined. The LUISS LabGov team shared the proposed timeline of the process and the participants integrated and refined it on the basis of their availabilities. They meeting then proceeded with a co-working session focused on the creation of internal working groups within the participants, according to the activities that will be implemented in the Rome Collaboratory.

The meeting concluded with the participants taking the commitment of investing efforts in the following week to engage more district actors that they have relationship with into the LAP incubation process.

The next meeting is organized for the following week and will focus specifically on the co-design of the LAP’s specific activities and the stakeholders’ outreach and engaging strategy.

#Europeforculture #cultural #heritage #H2020 #CoRoma#iBenidiRoma #cityasacommons #Collaboratorio #CollaboratorioRoma

Cities and international law in the Urban Age: LabGov presents research on the role of cities and city networks in global urban health governance in the Hague

Cities and international law in the Urban Age: LabGov presents research on the role of cities and city networks in global urban health governance in the Hague

On 14 & 15 March, the Asser Institute Center for International and European LAW in The Hague is hosting an international conference on the internationalisation of cities: Cities and international law in the Urban Age. The conference is part of Asser’s research project on global cities and international law, ‘The Global City: The Role of Law, Then and Now’. The conference co-chairs, Helmut Aust (Freie Universität Berlin), Janne Nijman (T.M.C. Asser Instituut/University of Amsterdam) are working on a book project on this topic and the conference is gathering chapters’ authors to discuss preliminary drafts of their contribution. The conference supported by the Municipality of The Hague and the Gieskes Strijbis Foundation and benefits moreover from close contacts with the International Law Association’s Study Group ‘The Role of Cities in International Law’ .

The conference program is available here.

LabGovs’ researchers Christian Iaione and Elena De Nictolis will contribute with a chapter on The Role of Cities in Global Urban Health Governance, named “Glocalized Laws for a Commons-based Urban welfare State”. The chapter investigates the role of cities in the institutional and regulatory framework of global health governance. The chapter proposes an empirical analysis of international and EU case studies of policies calling upon cities to improve urban health and welfare and provides innovative legal and financing tools for urban health infrastructures.

The conference gather a pool of scholars dealing with a number of cross-cutting issues regarding the relationship between cities and the international law and global governance. The conference hosted a keynote speech by the prominent scholar Yshai Blank (Professor of Law and the Head of the Ph.D. Program at Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law). Among the many panels, the Panel V. The changing relationship between Cities, States and International Law chaired by Dimitri van den Meerssche hosts contribution by LabGov Georgetown scholars Sheila Foster and Chrystie Swiney The Urbanization of International Legal Relations and contribution by Eduard Fromageau on the Role of Cities in Global Administrative Law, (a field where the Italian legal scholar Sabino Cassese is a leading scholar). The contribution by Professor Barbara Oomen (Utrecht University, project leader of the Cities of Refuge project) on Cities, Refugees and Migration in Panel III highlighted the role of cities in securing human rights protection, analyzing several case studies such as Barcelona, which is investing considerable efforts towards implementation of human rights through a strategy based on supporting urban commons.

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU 2019 Module II

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU 2019 Module II

Co-working session “Entrepreneurial lab” with Alessandro Piperno

The Module II of the Urban Clinic of LabGov EDU 2019 continues with a Co-working session on March 2nd, “Entrepreneurial lab” facilitated by Alessandro Piperno (Phd student at the Department of Economics and Management of LUISS University).

The co-working session takes place in the LUISS Campus of Viale Romania and starts at 10 am with a recap on the project idea that the LabGovers (the students enrolled in the Urban Clinic) are incubating: a network of digital community gardens spread among city neighborhoods that among the other things provide contents on food, wellness and healthy lifestyle. The co-working session of the “Entrepreneurial lab” of March 2nd is focused on the design of the social business model of the entrepreneurial idea.

After an introduction on the main features of a social enterprise, an hybrid enterprise aimed at solving social challenges with a sustainable business model, the group worked on the identification and definition of the main services that the enterprise wants to offer. This phase of the co-working session leveraged on the work carried by the four LabGovers’ working groups in the period between the modules.

After the definition of the service, the LabGovers are divided into groups and worked on the social business model canvas, identifying its core elements: stakeholders; actions; resources; types of intervention; channels to distribute the service; beneficiaries of the action and targets; clients and users; revenues; costs.

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU_2019. Module II

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU_2019. Module II

Workshop “Social Business Modeling” with Professor Francesco Rullani, March first 2019

The second module of the Urban Clinic of LabGov EDU 2019 focuses his activities on social entrepreneurship. The module is composed by a workshop, carried out by Professor Francesco Rullani on the organization of social enterprises and social business modeling and a co-working session facilitated by Alessandro Piperno, an “Entrepreneurship Lab”.

The workshop on social business modeling was hosted on March 1st 2019, at the LUISS campus of Viale Romania and consisted in a lecture by Francesco Rullani. Francesco Rullani is Assistant Professor in Entrepreneurship and Management of Innovation at LUISS Guido Carli in Rome (IT) and Coordinator of the ERSHub (the Hub for Ethics, Responsibility and Sustainability). 

Professor Rullani starts its presentation on “The Commons and Business models” with a discussion on the major philosophic and journalistic work of the political philosopher Hannah Arendt. Professor Rullani argues that the main message that we can take out of the book Is that within a hierarchical regime there is a detachment between the task that one must carry out (the order to be executed) and what one does to concretely carry out the task. The banality of evil is represented by the fact that, within the totalitarian regime, the approach of the people towards their actions was de-humanized. The human dimension was banalized until it disappeared, and so was the perception of the true meaning of the action.

The lecture then moves towards Milgram experiment on human behavior that was carried out in the aftermath of the Eichmann process in Jerusalem (1961) A social psychology experiment conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram, it measured the willingness of study participants to obey an authority figure that was instructing them to perform acts conflicting with their personal conscience, for instance violent acts. They had to administer electric shocks to a subject to which they were posing questions. For every wrong answer, the voltage of the electric shock increased gradually, until they reached levels that would have been fatal. The electric shocks were unreal (the learners were in fact Milgram’s collaborators). The experiment highlighted the role played by obedience to authority in a closed and hierarchical system.

The learning point is that life in social systems is filled with coercive systems that impose and nudge behaviors. And such systems are stronger than the community ties, because they have the capacity and the strength to absorb individuals’ responsibilities. The two main systems are the State and the Market.

Those systems solve their problems through bureaucracy (the State) and transactions (the Market). The systems are designed to reproduce mechanisms on which they are based and to expand their sphere of action. f you ask the bureaucracy to solve a problem, it will do it by producing procedures, while if you ask a community to solve a problem it will produce responsibilities. The social sector (in Italy, the third sectors) is mainly composed by communities regulated by systems based on responsibilities. Those systems solve their problems through bureaucracy (the State) and transactions (the Market). The systems are designed to reproduce mechanisms on which they are based and to expand their sphere of action. f you ask the bureaucracy to solve a problem, it will do it by producing procedures, while if you ask a community to solve a problem it will produce responsibilities. The social sector (in Italy, the third sectors) is mainly composed by communities regulated by systems based on responsibilities.

 A key issue with the social sector is though economic sustainability. There is in fact often a tension between the creation of economic value and the normative foundations of such communities and this tension is one of the factor hampering the production of value in social enterprises. Other factors hampering the access to value production in social enterprises could be, for instance, the lack of access to credit warranty (which could be solved through the creation of collaborative and solidarity networks between social entrepreneurs) or the lack of skills. The social enterprises therefore often comes out with hybrid solutions, hybrid practices that allow them to use their productive capacity by integrating marginalized subjects and pursuing the social good. Example in Italy is the case of “Made in Carcere” (made in prison). The project consists in laboratories of construction with waste materials. In the labs, learning and facilitation to enable access to capital, skills and distribution for the access to the final market are provided. This is a case of a social enterprise that produce a positive impact both socially and environmentally by working against the sense of not being the creator of one’s life that affects an individual when she/he is in prison. By giving them access to such opportunity, they cease to be prisoners and begin to be workers responsible for what they produce and for what they do.