Urban Clinic LabGov EDU 2019 1st community gardening session

Urban Clinic LabGov EDU 2019 1st community gardening session

Save the date: next Saturday, 9th March we will host the first EDU@LabGov community gardening session in Luiss Community Garden from 10 am to 12am.

The LabGovers will work with recycled materials in order to build a prototype that they will install in Luiss and in the city of Rome. If you are interested in following their work, follow our official social network!

During the community gardening session, the LabGovers will put into practice what they are learning during the forms in the classroom therefore it will represent ahead important footstep in the realization of their project.

The assisted gardening is not only a didactic moment but an activity of practical collaborative among the boundaries of the University Luiss Guido Carli, that then the students will experiment on the field in the city of Rome.

Stay tuned!

Save the date: Sabato 9 marzo si terrà il primo community gardening della Clinica Urbana EDU@LabGov presso l’#OrtoLuiss dalle 10:00 alle 12:00.

Durante la sessione di community gardening i LabGovers, divisi dapprima in quattro gruppi sulle diverse aree di lavoro, dovranno presentare i dati raccolti nel corso della settimana e iniziare a dar forma al loro progetto. Inizieranno quindi un laboratorio di auto-costruzione che, tramite l’utilizzo di materiali riciclati, li porterà a realizzare un prototipo che installeranno nella città di Roma. Se volete saperne di più rimanete connessi ai nostri account social ufficiali quel giorno!

L’obiettivo è mettere in pratica ciò che gli studenti stanno apprendendo durante i moduli in aula, quindi rappresenterà un importante passo avanti nella realizzazione della loro idea.

Il gardening assistito non è solo un momento didattico ma un’attività di pratica collaborativa tra le mura dell’Università Luiss Guido Carli, che poi gli studenti sperimenteranno sul campo nella città di Roma.

Restate Connessi!

A collection of city-stories around the world

A collection of city-stories around the world

🎉☀️IT’S FRIDAY and you are just in time to catch up on the latest news from #cities around the world!

The LabGov team has collected for you some interesting urban stories from cities like Olinda, Lagos and Los Angeles!

Check out our weekly recap on the #UrbanMediaLab and get updated on what has been happening around the world before you start your weekend.

Is there a “concrete” architectural solution?

Concrete is one of the most polluting materials, and is said to release 4-8% of the world’s CO2. That is highly due to the clinker manufacture, part of the cement-making process. The latter also necessitates up to 10th % of the world’s industrial water use. Compiling examples of historical urban uses of concrete, the article traces the economic and architectural structural changes that should be operated as well as the change in mindset to achieve a more sustainable and viable development model.

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/feb/25/concrete-the-most-destructive-material-on-earth

A brief drawing History of Lagos

From a fisher village to skyscrapers and shaped musical movement and music giant as Fela Kuty, Lagos has also proved to be a resilient city. Through a colourful cartoon, Tayo Fatunla pays tribute to the most populated Nigerian city.

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/feb/22/afrobeat-and-traffic-choked-streets-in-indestructible-lagos-a-cartoon

Smart technological tools to tackle city issues

A short infographics on technological-based ideas to address the main city challenges; amongst which homelessness, pollution, and health.

Camarotização – Carnaval in Olinda, Brazil

This article illustrates how the carnaval in the city of Olinda in Brazil triggers social and spatial separation through the privatization of paying premises, in the so-called camarotização process,named after the term camarotes, which,means cabin. This process, linked to the American concept of skyboxification (M.Sandel) participates to the  “gourmetização do espaço”,  i.e economic-led separation and differenciation of spaces, that fuels socio-economic categorizations and discriminations.
Article in Portuguese

https://www.nexojornal.com.br/expresso/2019/02/28/A-%E2%80%98camarotiza%C3%A7%C3%A3o%E2%80%99-do-carnaval.-E-como-ela-se-manifesta-em-Olinda

Cities at war

Chronological presentation of cities photographs ravaged by war, or still at war.

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2018/jan/29/century-cities-war-london-beirut-baghdad-in-pictures

A new life for used coffee grounds

It takes more than 20 years for a cup of coffee to decompose. Kaffeform, a german start-up found a new way of creating coffee cups using old coffee grounds, wood and biological binders and thus proposing a reusable solution.

Art boom in Los Angeles

Written as a short story on the museums in Los Angeles by a New Yorker, the article sets the explanatory factors of the evolution of Los Angeles museums, making as well, an historical parallel with the city development and city artistic movements.

New Applications to help women address sexual harassment

SafetiPin and Harassmap are two technological tools created to support women facing sexual harassment in public spaces.

https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/harcelement-deux-applis-qui-rendent-les-villes-plus-sures-pour-les-femmes

Housing crisis in Canada

Natives canadians especially from the First Nation reserve are asking for property rights. Facing housing shortages, poor living conditions, poor health, indigenous people are urging the government for solutions since their current absence of ownership implies no asset and therefore no mortgage. However, if one solution could be abolishing 1876 Indian Act to enable private land ownership, this remains subject to criticism, among the Indigenous people notably. Some of them are trying to create new models of private homes ownership.

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/03/first-nations-canada-indigenous-housing-rights-landowners/583786/

Assets confiscation to combat organized criminality

Assets confiscation to combat organized criminality

Nowadays, we are witnessing an ever-changing[1] evolution of ordinary citizens’ position. Individuals and groups are no longer mere beneficiaries of administrative acts and procedures but – in a way – parts of them. In this very context, the regeneration of urban commons can be located, not only in renewal purposes, but as well in the involvement of city inhabitants. More specifically, urban regeneration is described[2] as «the recycling, transformation and innovation process of urban commons», contributing to promoting “urban creativity”, with the aim of ensuring and improving quality and accessibility.

Particularly, this writing wants to tackle the problem of “final use” of confiscated urban assets which are in a state of disrepair and neglect.

Before getting into the issue in question, it is necessary to clarify the meaning of confisca and “urban commons”.

In the Italian legal system, the antimafia confisca is a preventative property measure, introduced in 1965 and currently regulated by the so called Antimafia Code[3].

According to code provisions, in order to apply antimafia confisca two elements are required.

Starting from the subjective element, the individual who acquires the relevant asset must be recognized as “socially dangerous” at the moment of acquisition, irrespective of whether such status ceases or the person dies.

There are two objective elements: direct or indirect accessibility by the individual to the asset and existence of sufficient evidence in relation to the unlawful origin of the confiscated asset (such as the disproportion between the asset’s value and the income declared by the individual for tax purposes, as established by the legislator).

On the other hand, the “urban common assets” are generally defined[4] as «material, intangible and digital assets recognized by citizens and Public Administration as useful for individual and collective well-being.»

In the light of the foregoing, considering that confiscated assets are (usually) private assets which can be classified as “urban commons”, ordinary citizens’ involvement to administrative acts can be applied and procedures can play a role.

Pursuant to what discussed above, if it is true that private assets (both real estate and companies) can be classified as “urban commons”, the question is: Is it possible to apply the same art. 190, Codice dei contratti pubblici to confiscated assets so that they could be subject to the contract on social partnership and its procedure?

Art. 190, Codice dei contratti pubblici[5], introduced in the Italian legal system the so-called contract on social partnership, whose criteria and conditions can be defined by local authorities «on the basis of projects presented by individuals or groups as long as with regard to a specific territorial scope.»[6]

As clarified also by Antonella Manzione[7], the contract on social partnership provides for a call for tender where “a competition of ideas” occurs for the final use of common assets. It must be borne in mind, though, that this must happen within the limits established by the Italian Court of Auditors[8], which requires compliance with some elements previously identified by the local authority itself, such as the ratione personae scope.

More precisely, whereby there are “urban common assets” in a state of disrepair and neglect and the local authority intends to ensure their exploitation «through cultural initiatives, urban renewal, restoration and refurbishment for general interest objectives»,[9], it should issue a call for applications and then conclude the contract on social partnership.

Carlo Pezzullo


[1] In this connection, CHITI E., La rigenerazione di spazi e beni pubblici: una nuova funzione amministrativa?, in DI LASCIO F., GIGLIONI F., La rigenerazione di beni e spazi urbani. Contributi al diritto delle città, Il Mulino, Bologna, 2017.

[2] According to art. 2.1, Regolamento del Comune di Bologna.

[3] The d. lgs. 159/2011 as reformed by the Law 161/2017.

[4] According to art. 2.1, Regolamento del Comune di Bologna.

[5] The d. lgs. 50/2016, as revisited by d. lgs. 56/2017.

[6] Art. 190 Codice dei contratti pubblici.

[7] The Italian Consigliera di Stato Antonella Manzione, during a lesson at LUISS Guido Carli with Prof. Christian Iaione, 2018 nov. 20.  

[8] Court of Auditors, sez. reg. Emilia-Romagna, 2016 march 23, n. 27; sez. reg. Lombardia, 2016 sep. 6, n. 225. 

[9] Art. 190 Codice dei contratti pubblici.

Workshop on ‘Local Communities and Social Innovation for the Energy Transition’ November 22-23

Workshop on ‘Local Communities and Social Innovation for the Energy Transition’ November 22-23

In an increasingly polluted world the local communities bring with them a huge, but unfortunately often neglected, potential for the development of social innovation initiatives aimed at a radical change in favor of renewable energy.

The seminar “Local Communities and Social Innovation for the Energy Transition” to be held at JRC Ispra Site (Ispra, Varese, Italy) on 22 and 23 November 2018 aims to study this potential and research recommendations aimed at obtaining a better exploitation of energy resources.

Furthermore, existing obstacles and conditions that favor or undermine the potential of local communities in the development of remedies of this kind will be discussed, as well as new models of innovation governance useful for the growth, consolidation and dissemination of social innovation initiatives in local communities.

We will also discuss the characteristics that allow local energy communities to be recognized in the panorama of EU regulations and how they can be disseminated through European policy. Some of the main existing examples of initiatives of local energy communities developed in the EU will be discussed below.

Finally, particular attention will be given to the important role that can be played by municipalities, both as local energy communities, as facilitators and as promoters of social innovation initiatives.

At the seminar will be present: Nicola Labanca (JRC Energy Efficiency and Renewables Unit), Sabine Hielscher (University of Sussex – UK), Josh Roberts (RESCoop.eu, Belgium), Paolo Bertoldi  (JRC Energy Efficiency and Renewables Unit), Christian Iaione (LUISS Guido Carli University, IT), David Hammerstein (Commons Network), Fritz Reusswig (Potsdman Institute for Climate Impact Research, DE), : Daniele Paci (JRC Energy Efficiency and Renewables Unit), Jan Steinkohl (European Commission, DG ENER, Brussels), Dirk Hendricks (European Renewable Energy Federation, Brussels), Nikolaos Hatziargyriou (National Technical University of Athens, EL), Fabio Monforti (JRC Air and Climate Unit), Anna Mengolini (Energy Security, Distribution and Markets Unit, Joint Research Centre), Sarah Rieseberg (Arepo Consult, DE), Chiara Candelise (IEFE Bocconi University, IT), Gianluca Ruggieri (Insubria University, IT), Dick Magnusson (Linköping University, SE), Verhoeven Sofie (Ghent Municipality, BE), Lourdes Berdié (Network for Energy Sovereignty – Barcelona).

Professor Iaione, co-founder of LabGov, will present in the second discussion panel “Governance and Local Communities’ Social Innovation: which governance
approaches are needed to stimulate this innovation?” on the “Pooling Economy, Tech Justice and Urban Experimentalism for a Human Rights-based Approach to the Sharing Economy”.

A week contributing to the co-governance of Dutch cities

A week contributing to the co-governance of Dutch cities

 

From Wednesday 20 to Sunday 24 June Pakhuis de Zwijger (Amsterdam Metropolitan Area) will host the We Make The City Festival. Five days celebrating the urban living by collectively debate the challenge of making better cities. This huge event will erupt in the streets of Amsterdam with 30 urban talks, 50 workshops, 30 city expeditions, 15 special events, and 10 exhibitions bringing together 600 local, national and international speakers, and 30.000 participants including municipal workers, inhabitants, active citizens, commuters, and visitors to talk about the most urgent urban issues like climate, safety, affordable housing, and health.

LabGov will participate in the session – on Thursday 21 June – about Co-Creating the City contributing to answering the question “How does co-creation work in the urban practice?”. The notion of co-creation evokes and resonates the one of co-governance in raising awareness and addressing the need of a collaborative city-making approach able to include different type of urban stakeholders (knowledge institutions, businesses, start-ups, SMEs, welfare organizations, social innovators and the government) for a more inclusive, innovative and sustainable urban development.

In the context of a full day debate with representative of European municipalities, foundations, citizens and civil society associations – including  Amsterdam, Athens, Ghent, Groningen, Lisbon, Madrid, Nantes, Reykjavik, Rotterdam, and Vienna – a well as researchers from worldwide knowledge institutions – like Harvard University, LabGov São Paulo and San José State University – and international networks like the Project for Public Spaces; LabGov will share the added value of the Co-City approach leading a panel to discuss “Infrastructure and the Co-City: How Might We Make Urban Infrastructure Work for Everyone?”.

Christian Iaione (Professor of Urban Law and Policy at LUISS University, and LabGov Co-Director), Sheila Foster (Professor of Law and Public Policy, University of Georgetown), Simone D’Antonio (URBACT), Asali DeVan Ecclesiastes (New Orleans Business Alliance), Marcella Arruda (Instituto A Cidade Precisa de Você, LabGov São Paulo) and Joachim Meerkerk (PhD researcher, Amsterdam University of Applied Science) – in a break-out session facilitated by Alicia Bonner Ness – will address the issue of how the Co-City approach can help city leaders and city-makers in serving collective needs leveraging public-community cooperation.

Key in the discussion will be the focus on infrastructures. Not only because urban infrastructures are the main resources in becoming urban commons if collaborative managed and collectively shared; but especially because this multi-stakeholder and democratic management of common goods is itself co-creating new infrastructure of urban governance. According with the Co-City methodology, in fact, the creation of a collaborative social and economic ecosystem will be transitioning urban governance from urban commons projects to the City as a Commons.

Another interesting highlight of the week will be the participation of Professor Christian Iaione in the EMMA experts event in The Hague on Wednesday 20 June that will also be focused on collaborative partnership between local public authorities, social innovators and civil society in the co-creation of the city that is the basis of the quintuple helix theory of the Co-City approach.

Find the complete program of the Festival on the official website: https://wemakethe.city/nl/programma


Dal 20 al 24 giugno Pakhuis de Zwijger (Amsterdam) ospiterà il We Make The City Festival: cinque giorni dedicati alla celebrazione dell’urban living attraverso un dibattito collettivo su come migliorare le nostre città. LabGov terrà, nella sessione “Co-Creating the City” un panel sull’approccio Co-Cities dal titolo “Infrastructure and the Co-City: How Might We Make Urban Infrastructure Work for Everyone” e una break-out session facilitata da Alicia Bonner Ness.