LabGov / Co-City is hiring!

LabGov / Co-City is hiring!

Project Fellow Opening: CO-CITY BATON ROUGE

The Marron Institute of Urban Management – NYU and LabGov are hiring a Project Fellow to work with Professor Sheila Foster (Georgetown and LabGov) and Professor Clayton Gillette, Director of the Marron Institute, on an urban revitalization project in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The project fellow will manage the combined effort of the Marron Institute and LabGov to bring a previously tested, co-governance approach (the “Co-City”) to Baton Rouge. The Co-City approach is rooted in a decade-long application and experimentation of various projects in distressed cities and neighborhoods, starting in European cities and continuing today in places as diverse as Amsterdam, Bologna, Turin, New York, Sao Paolo, and San Jose, Costa Rica. In each of these cities a variety of civic, neighborhood, and infrastructure goods and services are produced and managed through different forms of “pooling” and cooperation among five possible actors—public authorities, businesses, civil society organizations (NGOs), local social innovators, and academic/knowledge institutions. The Baton Rouge Co-City project will instigate a Co-City “cycle” or process that creates the environment for participants and stakeholders to arrive at locally adaptive, experimental and co-produced institutions, policies or practices. The Co-City process will operate in parallel to a comprehensive planning and redevelopment process overseen by the East Baton Rouge Redevelopment Authority.

To learn more about the Co-City Baton Rouge project and the requirements for the project fellow position, please visit this link.

The Co-Cities Open Book

The Co-Cities Open Book

The Co-Cities Open Book is the result of years of research and experimentations on the field to investigate new forms of collaborative city-making that are pushing urban areas towards new frontiers of participatory urban governance, inclusive economic growth and social innovation.

This open book has roots in our conceptualization of the ‘City as a Commons,’ the emerging academic field of urban commons studies, and the work developed in 5 years of remarkable urban experimentations in Italy and around the world. Structured around three main pillars, the Co-Cities open book will first provide scholars, practitioners and policy-makers with an overview of the theory and methodology of the Co-City with the “Co-Cities Protocol”.

The open book also presents the “Co-Cities report”, the results of an extensive research project in which we extracted from, and measured the existence of, Co-City design principles in a database of 400+ case studies in 130+ cities around the world. Ultimately, thanks to the Co-cities report we were able to create the first index able to measure how cities are implementing the right to the city through co-governance. Thus, the Co-Cities index serves as a fundamental tool for the international community in order to measure the implementation of some of the objectives that have been set by the New Urban Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals.

The last section of the book presents a collection, or annex, of articles of some of the most important researchers and practitioners studying the urban commons. These essays were conceived and offered as part of “The City as a Commons” conference, the first IASC (International Association for the Study of the Commons) conference on urban commons, co-chaired by Christian Iaione and Sheila Foster that took place in Bologna on November 6 and 7, 2015.

Download the first two sections from our website today! 

A Merry Christmas List of Movies on…Cities!

A Merry Christmas List of Movies on…Cities!

LabGov wishes you a wonderful holiday season with a non-exhaustive list of movies and documentaries, old and new, that will make your holidays more entertaining!

The list below does not follow an order and is the result of various consultations with friends and colleagues, if you wish to send us some suggestions, don’t hesitate to contact us on FB or twitter!

1.”News From Home”, Chantal Akerman

#ethnography

 

2. “Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du commerce 1080 Bruxelles”, Chantal Akerman 

#gender

 

 

3. “Battersea Power Station: Selling an icon”

#energy

 

4. “Rush Hour”, Luciana Kaplan 

#transportation

 

5. “H2Omx”, José Cohen and Lorenzo Hagerman

#water

 

6. “Men on the bridge”, Aslı Özge

#workers

 

 

7. “Relatos salvajes”, Damián Szifrón

#resilience

 

8. Cesta ven (the way out), Petr Václav

#urbanexclusion #romapeople

 

9. “Dark Days”, Marc Singer

#homelessness

 

10. “Quand il a fallu partir”, Mehdi Meklat and Badrou

#demolition

https://info.arte.tv/fr/quand-il-fallu-partir

 

11. “Ekumenopolis”, Imre Azem

#urbandevelopment #housing

 

12. “West Beirut”, Ziad Doueiri

#civilwar

 

13. “City of God”, Fernando Meirelles and Kátia Lund

#informality

 

14. “Lost in Translation”, Sofia Coppola

#Tokyo

 

15. “Roma”, Alfonso Cuarón 

#MexicoCity

 

16. “Le mani sulla città”, Francesco Rosi 

#speculation

 

17. “25th Hour”, Spike Lee

#newyorkcity

 

 

18. “Old Boy”, Park Chan-wook

#scarycities #seoul

 

19. “Taxi Teheran”, Jafar Panahi

#transportation

The Co-Cities Recipe for Just and Inclusive Cities

The Co-Cities Recipe for Just and Inclusive Cities

This week LabGov will be releasing the first section of the Co-Cities Open Book, a publication that is the result of years of research and experimentations on the field to investigate new forms of collaborative city-making that is pushing urban areas towards new frontiers of participatory urban governance, inclusive economic growth and social innovation. .

This open book has roots in our conceptualization of the ‘City as a Commons,’ the emerging academic field of urban commons studies, and the work developed in 5 years of remarkable urban experimentations in Italy and around the world [1]. Structured around three main pillars, the Co-Cities open book will first provide scholars, practitioners and policy-makers with an overview of the theory and methodology of the Co-City with the “Co-Cities Protocol”.

The open book also presents the “Co-Cities report”, the results of an extensive research project in which we extracted from, and measured the existence of, Co-City design principles in a database of 400+ case studies in 130+ cities around the world. Ultimately, thanks to the Co-cities report we were able to create the first index able to measure how cities are implementing the right to the city through co-governance. Thus, the Co-Cities index serves as a fundamental tool for the international community in order to measure the implementation of some of the objectives that have been set by the New Urban Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

 

The last section of the book presents a collection, or annex, of articles of some of the most important researchers and practitioners studying the urban commons. These essays were conceived and offered as part of “The City as a Commons” conference, the first IASC (International Association for the Study of the Commons) conference on urban commons, co-chaired by Christian Iaione and Sheila Foster that took place in Bologna on November 6 and 7, 2015.

Don’t miss the publications of the Co-Cities Open Book sections on our website and social media pages in the coming weeks. A complete version of the open book, downloadable from our website, will be available at the beginning of January on our website.

 

 

[1] The theoretical background and literature of this project, and the conceptual pillars of the Co-City are based on the analytical framework developed in the following publications: Sheila Foster, The City as an Ecological Space: Social Capital and Urban Land Use, 82 Notre Dame L. Rev. 527 (2006-2007); Sheila Foster, Collective action and the Urban Commons, 58 Notre Dame L. Rev 57; Christian Iaione, Governing the Urban Commons, 1 It. J. pub. l. 170 (2015); Christian Iaione, The CO-city, 75 The American Journal of Economics and sociology, 2 (2016); Sheila Foster & Christian Iaione, The City as a Commons, 34 yale l. & pol’y rev 81 (2016); Christian Iaione, The Law and Policy of Pooling in the city, Fordham Urban Law Journal 34:2 (2016) and Sheila Foster & Christian Iaione, Ostrom in the City: design principles for the urban commons, The Nature of cities, https://www.thenatureofcities.com/2017/08/20/ostrom-city-design-principles-urban-commons/. (20 August 2017).

Ostrom in the City: from the urban commons to the Co-City – December 5

Ostrom in the City: from the urban commons to the Co-City – December 5

In collaboration with The Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy, the School of Community and Public Affairs, and the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, the Center for research on social innovations – CRISES is hosting Sheila Foster (Professor of Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University and Co-Director of LabGov) and Christian Iaione (Professor of Land Use, Regulatory Innovation, Urban Law and Policy at LUISS Guido Carli University School of Law and Co-Director LabGov) for the lecture “Ostrom in the City: from the urban commons to the Co-City”.

“Ostrom in the City: from the urban commons to the Co-City” signifies a shift in the study of urban commons towards an innovative governance model that has the potential to address the main challenges our cities are facing today. Sheila Foster and Christian Iaione have developed this framework through years of academic research and experimentations in cities. They take reference from Elinor Ostrom’s groundbreaking research about collaborative management of common pool resources, or commons, for economic and environmental sustainability adapting the Ostrom design principle to the urban context with the aim of rethinking the governance of cities and the management of their resources. Urban commons are different from natural resources and more traditional commons in important ways, so the adaptation of Ostrom’s theories to the urban context implied an extensive research.

The study at the basis of their Co-City model surveyed 100+ cities around the world to extract from these examples a set of design principles that resulted distinctively different from those offered by Elinor Ostrom but kept the potentiality of paving the way towards a transition to more fair, inclusive, sustainable, resilient futures given existing patterns of urbanization and the contested nature of urban resources.

To learn more about the Co-City approach please visit: http://commoning.city/co-city-approach/

The event will take place on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, 5 pm – 7 pm, at Concordia University, Atrium – Samuel Bronfman Building, 1590 Dr. Penfield (corner Cote-des-neiges).

For more information: polanyi.institute@concordia.ca.